Festival

In part one of this series we looked at the physical network, part two covered the logical network and now in the third and final part we reach the edge network. Everything that has gone before is purely to enable the users and devices which connect to the network to deliver a service. For this blog we’ll take a journey through the different user groups and look at how the network services their requirements and the way technology is changing events.

Event Production

Making everything tick along from the first day of build until the last day of derig is a team of dedicated production staff working no matter whatever the weather. It is perhaps obvious that they all need internet access but the breadth of requirements increases year on year. Email and web browsing is only a part of the demand with applications such as cloud based collaboration tools sharing CAD designs and site layouts, along with event management applications dealing with staff, volunteers, traders, suppliers and contractors all being part of the wider consumption of bandwidth.

Just about everything to do with the delivery of an event these days is done in a connected way and as such reliable connectivity is as important as power and water.

Across the site, indoors and outdoors are carefully positioned high capacity Wi-Fi access points delivering 2.4GHz and 5GHz wireless connectivity to all the key areas such as site production, technical production, stewarding, security, gates and box offices. Different Wi-Fi networks service different users – from encrypted and authenticated production networks to open public networks – each managed with specific speeds and priorities. To deliver a good experience to the high density of users’ careful wireless spectrum management is essential, in some cases using directional antennas to focus the Wi-Fi signal in specific directions (rather like using a torch to focus light in a specific area). With so many wireless systems used on event sites interference can be a real challenge so wireless scanners are used to look for potential problems with active management and control used to make sure there are no ‘rogues’.

Not everything is wireless though, many devices, such as VoIP phones and some users require a wired connection as suggested by Ucaas Review since so many cabins have to be wired to from network switches. Some sites may have over 200 VoIP (Voice over IP) phones providing lines for aspects such as enquiries, complaints, box offices, emergency services as well as a reliable communications network where there is no mobile service or the service struggles once attendees arrive. Temporary cabins play host to array of IT equipment such as printers, plotters and file servers all of which need to be connected.

As equipment evolves more and more devices are becoming network enabled, for example power is a big part of the site production with an array of generators across the site. The criticality is such that a modern generator can be hooked into the network like any other device to be monitored and managed remotely. On big sites even the 2-way radios may be relayed between transmitters across the IP network. Technical production teams also use the network to test the sound levels & EQ from different places.

Event Control

Once an event is running it is event control that becomes the hub of all activity. Alongside laptops, iPads and phones, large screens display live CCTV image from around the site – anywhere from two to over a hundred cameras may be sending in high definition video streams with operators controlling the PTZ (Pan/Tilt/Zoom) functionality as they deal with incidents. A modern PTZ camera provides an incredible level of detail with a high optical zoom, image stabilisation, motion detection and tracking, picture enhancement and low light/infra-red capability. CCTV may be thought of as intrusive but at events its role is very broad playing as much a part in monitoring crowd flows, traffic management and locating lost children as it is in assisting with crime prevention.

Mast & Cameras

These cameras may be 30m up but they can deliver incredibly detailed images across a wide area

Full-HD and 4K Ultra HD cameras can deliver video streams upwards of 10Mbps, with 360 degree panoramic cameras reaching 25Mbps depending on frame rate and quality, this creates many terabytes of data which has to be archived ready to be used as evidence if needed, requiring high capacity servers to both record and stream the content to viewers. One event this year created over 12TB of data – the equivalent of 2,615 DVDs!

As everything is digital, playback is immediate allowing incidents to be quickly identified and footage or photos to be distributed in minutes. Content is not only displayed in a main control room but is also available on mobile devices both on the site and at additional remote locations.

Special cameras provide additional features such as Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) for use at vehicle entrances or people counting capability to assist with crowd management. Body cameras are becoming more common and now drone cameras are starting to play a part.

At the gates staff are busy scanning tickets or wristbands, checking for validity and duplication in real-time across the network back to central servers. The entrance data feeds to event control so they can see how many people have entered so far and where queues may be building. Charts show whether flow is increasing or decreasing so that staff can be allocated as needed.

For music events especially, noise monitoring is important and this often requires real-time noise levels to be reported across the network from monitors placed outside the perimeter of the event. Other monitors are increasingly important, ranging from wind-speed to water levels in ‘bladders’ used for storing water on site. The advent of cheap GPS trackers is also facilitating better monitoring of large plant and key staff.

External information is also important for event control with live information required on weather, transport, news and increasingly social media. Sources such as Twitter and Facebook are scanned for relevant posts – anything from complaints about toilets to potential trouble spots.

Bars, Catering, Traders & Exhibitors

For those at an event selling anything from beer to hammocks, electronic payment systems have been one of the biggest growth areas. From more traditional EPOS (Electronic Point of Sales) systems through to chip & pin/contactless PDQs, Apple Pay, iZettle and other non-cash based solutions. These systems are particularly critical in nature transacting many hundreds of thousands of pounds during an event with some sites deploying hundreds of terminals.

High volume sales such as bars also require stock management systems linking both onsite and offsite distribution to ensure stocks are maintained at an appropriate level. A recent development is traders operating more of a virtual stand with limited stock on site, instead the customer browses online on a tablet to order and have the product delivered to home after the event.

Sponsors

Most events have an element of sponsorship with each brand wanting to lead the pack in terms of innovation and creativity. Invariably these ‘activations’ involve technology in some form – from basic internet access to more involved interaction using technology such as RFID, GPS, augmented reality and virtual reality.

There are often multiple agencies and suppliers involved with a short window in which to deploy and test just as the rest of the event is reaching its peak of build activity. To be exciting the sponsor wants it to be ‘leading edge’ (or ‘bleeding edge’ as it is sometimes known!), which typically means on the fly testing and fixing.

Media & Broadcast

Media Centre

Busy media centres create demanding technical environments

From a gaggle of photographers wanting to upload their photos to a mobile broadcast centre, the reliance on technology is huge at a big event. Live streaming is increasingly important, both across the site and also out to content distribution networks. These often require special arrangements with guaranteed bandwidth and QoS (Quality of Service) controls to ensure the video or audio stream is not interrupted. It is not unusual to get requests for upwards of 200Mbps for an individual broadcaster.

More and more broadcasters are moving to IP solutions (away from dedicated broadcast circuits) requiring higher capacity and redundancy to ensure the highest availability. These demands increasingly require fibre to the truck or cabin with dedicated fibre runs back to a core hub.

Alongside content distribution, good quality, high density Wi-Fi is essential in a crowded media centre with the emphasis on fast upload speeds. Encoders and decoders are used to distribute video streams around a site creating IPTV networks for both real-time viewing and VoD (Video-on-Demand) applications. The next growth area is 360 degree cameras used to provide a more immersive experience both onsite and for remote watchers.

Attendees

Then after all this there may be public Wi-Fi. For wide-scale public Wi-Fi (as opposed to a small hotspot) it is typical over the duration of an event for at least 50% of the attendees to use the network at some point – the usage being higher when event specific features are promoted such as smartphone apps and event sponsor activities.

The step-up from normal production services to a large scale public Wi-Fi deployment is significant – a typical production network would be unlikely to see more than 1,000 simultaneous users, but a big public network can see that rise beyond 10,000, requiring higher density and complex network design, as well as significantly greater backhaul connectivity with public usage pulling many terabytes of data over a few days.

With a significant number of users, a large amount of data can be collected anonymously and displayed using an approach known as heat mapping to show where the highest density of users are and how users move around an event site. This information is very useful for planning and event management.

crowd

Public Wi-Fi has to deal with thousands of simultaneous connections

Break It Down

As the final band is doing their encore, or the show announces it is time to close the team switch to follow the carefully designed break down plan. What can take weeks to build is removed within a couple of days, loaded into lorries, shipped back to the warehouse to be reconfigured and sent out to next event. Sometimes tight scheduling means equipment goes straight from one country or job to the next. But not everything is removed at once, a subset of services remains for the organisers whilst they clear the site until the last cabin is lifted onto a lorry and we remove the last Wi-Fi access point and phone.

The change over the last five years has been rapid and shows no sign of slowing down as demand increases and services evolve. Services such as personal live streaming, augmented reality, location tracking and other interactive features are all continuing to push demands further.

So yes we provide the Wi-Fi at events but when you see an Etherlive event network on your phone spare a thought as to what goes on behind the scenes.

Event technology plays a major role in the way we plan and organize our events today. According to the below infographic, which takes a close look at the impact of technology on the success of events in 2016, a huge 75% of event professionals are expected to buy apps to facilitate engagement with their audience. Many companies have also stepped up their live streaming activities to reach a larger audience and stand out from the competition. Social media, which offers companies powerful opportunities to promote event awareness or create a new information channel, remains another top favourite.

Of course all of this introduces potential complexity which requires detailed knowledge and planning across a broad spectrum of technology. With the summer season of events already ramping up fast it is critical that organisers plan well in advance and work with the right experienced people to ensure all the different aspects are integrated into a realistic and workable solution. Last minute panics on-site are not desirable and generally push up costs, a well planned, integrated approach is much better!

Source: http://www.losberger.co.uk/

Event Technology: Will This Define Success in 2016?

15360051168_4162e2067e_kSorry to disappoint, but yes our blog last week on Li-Fi at festivals was an April Fool’s joke. The response to it though highlights just how much importance people put on remaining connected whilst at events.

Li-Fi is a real technology and does hold promise but it is practically much more suited to indoor environments and certainly not outdoor lighthouses! As with many technologies theoretical speeds are indeed very fast in the lab but real-world use is some way off, in the meantime Wi-Fi and 3G/4G remain the primary options for keeping connected.

All is not lost though as these technologies continue to develop, and more and more events are deploying infrastructure to improve attendee experience. Wi-Fi has moved a long way from the days of 11Mbps 802.11b, one of the first standards. Modern 802.11ac wireless access points support far more users, offer much higher speeds and contain a raft of technology to create the best user experience. A well designed high-density Wi-Fi deployment using 802.11ac and directional antennas can support thousands of simultaneous users and still provide good speeds.

The rapid deployment of 4G infrastructure by mobile carriers has improved connectivity at smaller events but events attracting more than a few thousand quickly overload cell towers which are limited by spectrum availability and coverage size.

Testing is underway with new technologies which may help – the first is LTE-U (Long Term Evolution Unlicensed) which more simply put is using unlicensed spectrum such as 5 GHz to deliver additional 4G capacity. The challenge is that this technology introduces yet another connectivity method into what is becoming very congested spectrum. It is in effect robbing Peter to pay Paul and therefore the approach has split the industry due to concerns over the impact it may have on Wi-Fi installations.

Another approach in testing, supported by Ruckus and Qualcomm amongst others, is OpenG using shared spectrum at 3.5 GHz in the US. It is not dissimilar to LTE-U but because it uses different shared spectrum does not clash with existing Wi-Fi. With the Ruckus solution the 3.5GHz radio is being integrated into existing dual-band Wi-Fi access points providing a triple radio solution in one unit which can be deployed easily.

Wi-Fi also continues to evolve with 802.11ac now at ‘wave 2’, a fuller implementation of the standard featuring ‘Multi-User MIMO’, a way of better utilising spatial channels across devices giving increased capacity. Then there is 802.11ax, touting speeds of 10 Gbps but we won’t see that any time soon as the standard is unlikely to be ratified until at least 2019 by which time Li-Fi may also be a reality!

Unfortunately, as is typical with these mobile technology evolutions, once testing and approval is complete there is a lag whilst the mobile handset manufacturers catch up with integrating the technology and penetrating the market which can add several years before mass market adoption is reached.

In the meantime, well implemented 802.11ac Wi-Fi remains the best approach for high density connectivity, and that’s certainly what we will be using this summer.

Lighthouse

During the summer of 2016 Etherlive will be piloting the innovative new Li-Fi (Light Fidelity) technology at a range of festivals and outdoor events. Operating in a similar way to Wi-Fi the technology uses light rather than wireless signals to transmit data to mobile devices and can offer very high data rates up to 1,000 times faster than Wi-Fi.

To enable this existing mast structures used on sites for CCTV and wireless transmission will be converted to ‘lighthouses’ firing out powerful rapid oscillating infrared beams. Early adopters will be offered an adapter for their mobile devices which when worn externally (such as on the head) will receive and transmit a light pattern to the lighthouse. The device can operate with both infrared and visible light so that at night the festival can be illuminated with thousands of tiny LED lights in multiple colours depending on the speed of connection (green for high speed, amber for slow, red for not connected).

To overcome the issue of more crowded areas the external antennas will be extendable to provide extra height, and will conveniently double up as a lantern when used inside tents.

Etherlive are working in conjunction with Li-Fi developers on this new exciting technology to be known as the Advanced Photocell Rotating Illuminated Lighthouse Gen 1 which can be used alongside our existing range of technology services.

Watch out for which events will be supporting this new initiative over the coming months!

Event Technology Myths

For our third myth busters article Wi-Fi becomes the focus, touching on the relationship between microwave ovens, water and Wi-Fi, wireless signal propagation and Wi-Fi security.

My microwave oven stops my Wi-Fi from working properly – TRUE (but not always)

For the non-technical the idea that whilst warming up a bowl of soup in the microwave oven you struggle to browse the internet on your Wi-Fi seems bizarre but it can indeed be true. The reason is quite straightforward – the frequency of the microwaves used in a microwave oven are around 2.4GHz which is the same frequency as used by one of the two Wi-Fi bands. The issue can occur because microwave ovens are not always perfectly shielded so some of the microwaves can leak out (harmlessly) and interfere with the Wi-Fi. Industrial microwaves tend to be more of an issue as they use higher power.

The good news is that the 5GHz Wi-Fi band which is now more commonly supported in devices is not impacted by microwave ovens – although it can be affected by RADAR but that’s another story!

My Wi-Fi works through walls but not through trees – TRUE

The way wireless signals propagate through objects is quite a complex area but there some general rules. The first relates to 2.4GHz Wi-Fi and interestingly links back to microwave ovens. The reason microwave ovens operate around 2.4GHz is that this is the resonant frequency of water so if you bombard water with 2.4GHz microwaves the molecules vibrate vigorously and the water (or your food that contains water) heats up. This is great when you want to cook bacon quickly but no so good when you want to pass a 2.4GHz Wi-Fi signal through trees which contain lots of water – the signal is simply absorbed into all the water.

It is very important to note that Wi-Fi signals are extremely low power in comparison to a microwave oven so you will not cook yourself if you absorb Wi-Fi signals! On event sites trees can become a real bane for the IT engineers trying to run wireless links which is why you will hear them talking about ‘Line of Sight’.

When it comes to walls it does depend on the type of wall – a basic plasterboard or normal brick wall will only absorb some of the Wi-Fi signal, a more substantial wall will absorb more. Walls which have metal mesh in them will often block Wi-Fi altogether. On the whole though a strong Wi-Fi signal will pass through most normal walls. Windows can help or hinder depending on the type of glass used as modern thermal insulating glass can block Wi-Fi signals quite effectively.

Temporary structures at events sites are a whole case in themselves, some temporary cabins are near enough transparent to Wi-Fi but others, particularly the newer well insulated variety, are just about impervious requiring Wi-Fi access points in each cabin. Marquees and other temporary structures often exhibit a different behaviour, being transparent in good weather but more opaque when it starts raining! The water coats the marquee or structure and can create a reflective layer and also absorb signals so that less signal gets through.

The second element of this relates to the frequency of the Wi-Fi as when it comes to wireless signals the lower the frequency the greater the propagation. This is seen most obviously when you have dual band Wi-Fi operating at 2.4GHz and 5GHz. The lower frequency 2.4GHz signal will travel further than the 5GHz signal, and this becomes an important point when designing Wi-Fi coverage (along with lots of other factors!)

All Wi-Fi networks are insecure – BUSTED

Because Wi-Fi is a broadcast technology that passes through the open air anyone with the right equipment can pick up the signal, for this reason it is very important that these signals are encrypted to avoid information being intercepted by the wrong people. One of the most common ways of encrypting a Wi-Fi network is by using a technology called WPA2 – Wi-Fi Protected Access.

WPA2 is commonly set-up with a Pre-Shared Key (PSK), this alphanumeric string should only be known by those who need access to the network and they enter the key when they are connecting to the network. The potential problem with this approach is that the PSK is used to generate the encryption key and if you use a weak key then the network is left open to a fairly simple attack which can gain access to the network within minutes.

The solution is simple – longer and more complex keys! For every character added the cracking process becomes considerably harder by a factor of compute years. The question is how long. There is no agreed answer on this as it depends on how random the key is. A truly random key of 10 alphanumeric characters is actually very hard to break, taking many years but a similar length key using dictionary words could be broken very quickly.

To be safe we normally recommend a minimum of 12 characters with typical password rules – upper and lower case, numeric characters, special characters and no dictionary words unless they have character replacements.

Of course a strong key only remains strong whilst it is only known by those who should know it and this is a weakness of the shared key approach as if the key is leaked, security across the network is compromised. There are additional factors that can be introduced to improve security further – for example one technique is called Dynamic Pre-Shared Key (D-PSK) which uses dynamic, unique keys for each user so there is no risk of a leaked key.

We will cover Wi-Fi and general network security in more depth in a later blog but with the right set-up Wi-Fi networks are perfectly secure – more so than most wired networks!

etherLive Final - In the CommunitySince our move to Royal Wootton Bassett in 2015 we thought we should look for some ways to help the local community. Etherlive has always had an active community programme and much of this has been in education including working with organisations such as Young Enterprise, Bath University, Bristol University, Bucks New University and several Wiltshire schools & colleges.

Whilst continuing to support a range of activities we thought a locally focussed IT Drop-In Centre could be of benefit to those living in the area. This free service is open to all members of the local community and will offer advice and support on personal IT issues. This can range from assistance in removing malware and viruses from a laptop to advice on social media privacy and online safety. You can get to learn the key points on how to safely use Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn; or perhaps it is applications like BBC iPlayer and All 4 that you would like help with. Got some questions about your home Wi-Fi or broadband? We are experts in this area! We’ll cater for complete new starters and the more experienced.

No pre-booking is required just drop in any time from 5pm until 8pm during one of the monthly sessions and chat to our friendly engineers who deal with troubleshooting problems everyday. Bring along your laptop or tablet and we will do what we can to help whilst you enjoy a cup of tea or coffee and discuss the ups and downs of the modern world of technology with our friendly and helpful staff.

The first of these monthly sessions will be held in our offices in Royal Wootton Bassett on Thursday March 17th from 5pm onwards. More details can be found on our community page.

 

 

Event Technology Myths

In the second part of our myth busting we look at satellite, high density Wi-Fi and broadband speed.

Satellite is the best all round solution for quick event deployment – BUSTED

Over the last few years KA band satellite has become a cheap option for temporary internet access, it can be a great solution in certain cases but there are many cases where it is not suitable. Satellite suffers from a high latency due to the distance to the satellite and this means every piece of data takes around 600ms to cross space. That delay might not seem much but it is crippling to services such as VPN (Virtual Private Networks), VoIP, video calls, online gaming and any application which requires lots of rapid two-way data traffic. It is great however for large file uploads and video streaming, however, it is important to watch data usage as this can rack up significant additional costs.

Satellite is also a poor solution for wide-scale access such as public Wi-Fi, this is because of a technology it uses to try and boost speed, the downside of which limits the number of simultaneous users who can connect to one satellite service. Most KA satellite services also have high contention ratios which can reduce the advertised 18Mbps/6Mbps type speeds down to something considerably lower, a similar trick is used with home broadband services. Uncontended services are available but the cost is much higher and other than for short durations (it’s normally sold in 15 minute slots) it is not competitive with other solutions.

Satellite can absolutely be the right approach, and we deploy lots of satellite solutions, but understanding the user requirements and explaining what the user experience will be like are extremely important to avoid disappointment and frustration.

Better Wi-Fi just means using more Wi-Fi access points – BUSTED

One of the most common problems with Wi-Fi networks is too many Wi-Fi access points and a poor design. A typical response to a user complaining about Wi-Fi is for another Wi-Fi access point to be deployed to ‘improve coverage’, yet frequently this just makes matters worse. Large scale and high density Wi-Fi requires very careful design to avoid what is known as Co-Channel Interference (CCI) where multiple wireless access points are in effect shouting at each other and slowing the whole network down.

Using fewer high capacity managed wireless access points with a detailed radio spectrum design, often with focused antennas, can deliver much high capacity and a better user experience than a thick blanket of access points. Good Wi-Fi design is a technical art requiring some very detailed knowledge – the output though is pretty much invisible to the normal user until it doesn’t work!

20Mbps of broadband speed is always the same – BUSTED

It would be nice if the experience and speed of all broadband services were the same so that when you are told you have 20Mbps that’s what you get. Reality is somewhat different and more complex due to a number of factors:

  • Contention Ratio – Nearly all providers contend their services, which effectively shares the capacity between multiple users, this can be as much as 50:1 whereby your 20Mbps is shared between 50 users! More normally 20:1 is seen, then 5:1 on more business (and expensive) orientated services, up to the perfect 1:1 (no contention).
  • Asynchronous / Synchronous – ADSL and FTTC (known as BT Infinity but also sold under different names) services are asynchronous, this means that the download speed is not the same as the upload speed. The original principle was that people need more download than upload speed but with modern cloud services, video calls and general rich media this has changed considerably and a low upload speed can be more crippling than the download speed. For example, you may have an ‘20Mbps ADSL service’ but typically the upload is only 768kbps and if the upload is at capacity the download becomes throttled due to the way TCP/IP networks work. Services such as true optic fibre (also sometimes called leased lines) are synchronous.
  • Connection Speed / Throughput Speed – This is primarily an issue for ADSL/FTTC but can be seen with other services too. The speed advertised by an ADSL modem when it connects is only the theoretical speed of the link between the modem and the local exchange. The real throughput or speed depends on the entire route from your computer to the location you are connecting to – this is a complex web of routers, fibre and ‘internet peering’. Different parts of that route may suffer congestion and reduce the overall speed of the connection. Choice of Internet Service Provider (ISP) is an important factor as the good ones have better peering and higher capacity links to reduce the risk of congestion and optimise routing.
  • Latency – Every device, cable and piece of fibre on a network through which data has to pass introduces an element of latency or delay- that’s due to physics. The amount of delay depends on distance (hence why satellite is a problem), quality of links (a poor link needs to use more error correction which adds delay), utilisation of links (high utilisation adds delay) and the number of routers, switches, etc. in the path. Good services may only add a few milliseconds of latency, poor ones several hundred milliseconds and that can make a big difference to user experience.

That’s it for issue 2. Next time, does my microwave really break my Wi-Fi? How comes Wi-Fi works through walls but not though trees? And should you worry about network security.

Welcome to the event technology myth busters! Just like the popular American show (Mythbusters –  check it out!) we will be taking myths we hear about from customers and proving, once and for all, if they are true, busted or plausible!Event Technology Myths

GPRS (mobile phone) PDQ systems are unreliable at events – TRUE

GPRS payment terminals are designed to connect to the same technology as your mobile phone so it stands to reason if your mobile phone is working it will, right? Right. Generally, GPRS networks operate really well and the unit works all over the place. The exception to this, unfortunately for those in the events industry, is that when the mobile phone network suffers from overload the terminals will have the same issue as you making a call. The majority of the mobile phone network is designed for large scale coverage area, not high density (such as 30,000 people in a field). If you are going to try and use a PDQ terminal in this type of situation it is much better to hire a cabled or Wi-Fi terminal as part of the event provision at the same time as you request services such as power.

Optic Fibre internet is always expensive – BUSTED

Optic fibre internet (sometimes called leased lines) is the best type of connectivity. It’s dedicated (just for you), has a fast support process and is generally very reliable. If your home broadband is like a B Road (narrow, busy and sometimes blocked unexpectedly) then optic fibre is the three lane motorway. Getting a motorway to your door can be expensive but for many locations it is now cost effective, especially over 3 or 5 years. Tricks to keeping the costs down? Order early, order from the right supplier and plan for the future, for example order a link with the highest capacity possible, just run it at a slower speed until you need more.

You can generate good revenue from charging for use of public Wi-Fi networks – BUSTED

It seems so obvious – deploy a public Wi-Fi network at an event and attendees will flock to it and pay to get a good service when the mobile networks become overloaded. Unfortunately, this isn’t the case as attendees are cautious about public Wi-Fi and do not like paying for it. This should not be a surprise considering most other public Wi-Fi in cafes, shopping centres, etc. is free at point of use or users get free access via an existing account such BT or Vodafone. Then add in the fact that at most events the attendee is paying to enter the event and you can see why they are reluctant to pay again.

Recovering the cost of deploying public Wi-Fi has to be a lot more creative – it is all about the content and the usage data. Lots of platforms out there now quickly and effectively collect marketing information from those using the service, such as email addresses, social media information, sites visited, etc. All of which can either be used for your own or other activations. Those using the networks need to agree, but many do once they appreciate the service has to be paid for in some way!

That’s it for this issue! More to come over the next few weeks including; Do all venues have sufficient internet access? Can wireless networks be customised with logos and text? Does streaming always suffer from site unless it has its own connection? Is satellite internet a good option for all events?